All articles 19

My client has a corporate font (Unit Pro). The company produces many multilingual documents in languages using Latin script as well as in Chinese. Is there a way to tell Windows something like: if Unit Pro is selected and some characters are missing, use "Custom Chinese Font" instead? In other words, is there a way how to define custom fallback font for Chinese glyphs under Windows? Any help appreciated.

Hi! I'm designing a layered typeface with three weights and some extra glyphs (ligatures, swashes and some weird alternates). I made open type feature for ligatures and kerns but I let some extra glyphs without feature. When I use those glyphs and I change the weight, the glyph doesn't change. For example, if I write "BARCELONA" with one of my extra B's, and I change the weight, it change all the word except the B.
I've been looking the generated file and it seems that those extra glyphs without feature doesn't have UICODE names, so when we change the weight, they doesn't change. I've tryied to use the option GLYPHS>GLYPHS NAME>GENERATE UNICODE but it doesn't work.
Anyone knows what can I do to generate the same UNICODE names on the three weights.
Thanks for your help and sorry for my english!

We work with packaging for many countries and has to deal with many languages, many we don't read and with alphabets we don't recognize. To control this we use software to control that the unicode values are the same in input (text in Word documents) and output (pdf generated from QuarkXpress) We are now struggling with differences in input & output for accented characters in Vietnamese text. So I wonder if the accented characters in Word can be the input (the characters you type) and not the result (the accented character)
Or is there an other explanation of the different unicode values for the same character? (the visual character is correct, this is verified by vietnamese)

We would like to learn how to incorporate a unicode character that exists in one (or more) font sets, but not in the font that we wish to use. Unicode 0268 is a small letter i with a stroke in, for example, New Tomes Roman, but we want to have it in Caslon. Any suggestions

I put the pre-alpha (but very usable for low enough resolutions) version of monospaced scalable variant of Unifont font to http://ilyaz.org/software/fonts.

It is constructed by a scanner/stroke-designer backend running over the 16×8, 16×16 bitmaps of Unifont. The scanner/designer are written in Perl; the scanner is ready, the designer 70% ready. (Of course, it turned out to be a much more complicated task than I expected at the start — 6 months ago!)
The frontend converting strokes to a font is EXTREMELY primitive (cooked in a day, and hitting new and new bugs in FontForge — sigh…). So I'm afraid any critique at this moment would be very premature…
I'm hitting my head again and again with .notdef; it does not work in Windows console if I include U+0000 and U+0001 glyphs. So currently I just omit these glyphs — is there any alternative? The recommendations in http://www.microsoft.com/typography/otspec/recom.htm are not very helpful: how can one include .null into a monospaced font?
Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

We work with packaging for many countries and has to deal with many languages, many we don't read and with alphabets we don't recognize. To control this we use software to control that the unicode values are the same in input (text in Word documents) and output (pdf generated from QuarkXpress) We are now struggling with differences in input & output for accented characters in Vietnamese text. So I wonder if the accented characters in Word can be the input (the characters you type) and not the result (the accented character)
Or is there an other explanation of the different unicode values for the same character? (the visual character is correct, this is verified by vietnamese)

I've found these spacing characters in Unicode. What are they for?

005E - CIRCUMFLEX ACCENT
0060 - GRAVE ACCENT
00A8 - DIARESIS
00B4 - ACCUTE ACCENT

and others.

Dear typophiles,

Does there exist any available application or tool for generating a pdf (or jpg or png or...) unicode code chart? For example, input a range (say, start=0600,stop=06FF) and a font name: Then the resultant pdf gives you a unicode code chart covering that range (as supported by the named font), with the code point as caption per each cell...

Anything like that available? Perhaps an online utility? Seems like a common enough task that a utility may be floating out there somewhere...

Thanks in advance!

Google now has the reading abilities of a teenager and can read f-ligatures: “[T]he characters fi can... be represented as two characters (f and i) or a special display form . A Google search for [financials] or [office] used to not see these as equivalent – to the software they would just look like *nancials and of*ce. There are thousands of characters like this, and they occur in surprisingly many pages on the Web, especially generated PDF documents. But no longer – after extensive testing, we just recently turned on support for these and thousands of other characters,” ostensibly including hieroglyphs.

Technically it is possible to add both a ligature in the common form of "f_f_i" (and its accompanying Feature code) and a separate Unicode glyph for the same character -- U+FB03 for "ffi" -- to the same font.
Is this a good idea? I'm pretty sure it's not!

I only tested this with InDesign, but I vaguely recalled that it would automatically use "fi" and "fl" ligatures, if a font had these characters in the correct Unicode positions. However, a quick test with a freshly created OTF font shows it does not (in CS4, at least). Perhaps this is (or was) only true for Plain Old Type 1 fonts without any further OTF enhancements.

Regardless: if I add both an "f_f_i" glyph and an "ffi" Unicode glyph to a font, what sort of issues would I encounter? Maybe all it shows is in what order the underlying software examines ligature candidates. Some might first parse OTF features (which -- again, I think -- would be preferable), where others might check the character map first.

Or maybe the entire font drawing machinery crashes.

Hello,

I installed the LisuUnicode font https://github.com/phjamr/LisuUnicode/blob/master/LisuUnicode-Regular.ttf on Windows 7 and it won't display unless you specify that you want to use that font. For example, if you select the Lisu font in Microsoft Word, it will display the Lisu input, but if you want to do anything in an another WIndows program, like Internet Explorer, it will just display boxes (unless the website has it specified in its stylesheet, that the font should be used). Interestingly it will always display in Firefox, but not in other browsers or in QQ (a chat program Chinese people frequently use). Lisu is a Chinese minority and there are a number of fonts available, but none works under Windows 7 or lower.

The font works fine in Windows 8, as well as on a Mac. Apparently also no problem on Linux. So why doesn't it display on older Windows versions, even though it is a Unicode font? We would really like to get the font working in any Windows program, so that the Lisu minority can start to communicate in their own language.

Thank you for any suggestions.

Philip

Hi all,

I tried asking this question over at the FontLab forum, but there doesn’t seem to be very much activity there, so I’m trying here as well. Apologies in advance if this question has been asked before – at any rate I have not been able to find an answer in the archives.

I am developing a font which includes a large number of glyphs in the Private Use Area. For these I would like to use my own names, primarily because many of them have alternate forms accessible through aalt, stylistic sets etc. Coding would get much easier if I could use semantic names rather than “uniExxx”, especially in case I want to change the Unicode index of a glyph (each time I do that, I have to track down every reference to that glyph in the code and change the name).

Problem is, when I use my custom names the OpenType features stop working, and InDesign gives the glyph names as <null>.

Is there any way to get custom names to work? If this has been answered before, kindly point me in the right direction. I read somewhere a comment to the effect that “sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t, but I don’t know why”.

Oh, and I know custom characters should not always be in the PUA. Suffice to say, I want them there in this particular font.

Yours,

Måns

Indices : Technical Info : Language Coverage

This article is designed to list which languages are supported by corresponding Unicode blocks. The rule used here to list languages is to list under scripts that have either official status or are still in popular usage, ie. Azerbaijani officially uses the Latin script, but many Azerbaijanis still use Cyrillic extensively.

Latin-1:

Albanian
Danish
Dutch
English
Faroese
Finnish
Flemish
German
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Malay
Norwegian
Portuguese
Scottish Gaelic
Spanish
Swahili
Swedish
Tagalog

Latin Extended-A: *

Afrikaans
Basque
Bosnian
Breton
Catalan
Chichewa
Cornish
Croatian
Czech
Esperanto
Estonian
Fijian
French
Frisian
Greenlandic
Hawaiian
Hungarian
Latin
Latvian
Lithuanian
Maltese
Maori
Moldavian
Navajo (Also requires some Combining Diacritcal Marks)
Polish
Provençal
Rhaeto-Romanic
Romanian
Romany
Sámi, Inari
Sámi, Lule
Sámi, Northern
Sámi, Southern
Samoan
Serbian
Slovak
Slovenian
Sorbian
Turkish
Welsh

Latin Extended-B: *

Azerbaijani (also requires some glyphs from Latin Extended-A)
Croatian
Livonian
Pinyin (Mandarin Romanization)
Sámi, Skolt

Latin Extended Additional: *

Coast Tsimshian
Guarani (Also requires some Combining Diacritical Marks)
Kwakʼwala (Also requires some Combining Diacritical Marks)
Nisghaʼa
Sanskrit Transliteration
Tlingit (Also requires some Combining Diacritical Marks)
Vietnamese
Welsh

IPA Extensions:

International Phonetic Alphabet

Greek:

Greek, Monotonic

Greek Extended: **

Greek, Polytonic

Cyrillic:

Abaza
Abkhaz
Adyghe
Altay
Azerbaijani
Avar
Balkar
Bashkir
Belorussian
Bulgarian
Buryat
Central Siberian Yupik
Chechen
Chuvash
Chukchi
Dargwa
Dungan
Erzya
Evenk
Kabardian
Kalmyk
Karachay
Kazakh
Khakas
Khalka
Khanty
Koryak
Kumyk
Kyrgyz
Lak
Lezgian
Macedonian
Mansi
Mari
Moksha
Moldavian
Mongolian
Nanai
Nenets
Nogai
Old Church Slavonic
Ossetian
Russian
Rusyn
Sámi, Kildin
Selkup
Serbian
Serbo-Croatian
Tabassaran
Tatar
Tajik
Turkmen
Tuvan
Udihe
Udmurt
Ukrainian
Uzbek
Yakut

Cyrillic Supplement:

Aleut
Chukchi
Chuvash
Enets
Itelmen
Khanty
Komi
Kurdish
Mordvin
Tlingit

Phonetic Extensions:

Uralic Phonetic Alphabet

Phonetic Extensions Supplement:

Uralic Phonetic Alphabet

Cyrillic Extended-A: §

Russian combining marks

Cyrillic Extended-B:

Old Church Slavonic

Hiragana & Katakana:

Japanese

CJK Unified Ideographs: ¨

Chinese
Japanese
Korean

Notes:
* Also requires Latin-1.
** Also require Greek.
† Also require Latin-1 & Greek.
‡ Also require Cyrillic.
¶ Also require IPA.
§ Also require Cyrillic Extended-B.
¨ Also require Hiragana & Katakana.

Sources:
Unicode 4.0.0, Chapter 7: European Alphabetic Scripts
Wikipedia: List of languages by writing system
Wikipedia: Languages using Cyrillic
Typblography: Extending Cyrillic character sets
Monotype: Non Latin Font Listing

Over at the Open Siddur Project, we've received a handful of requests for Unicode Hebrew fonts with interesting ligatures that I've seen in print but never before in a digital (Unicode) font.

The first is a bowing lamed. The second is a letter hey wherein the divine name אדוני (adonai, lit. lord/master) is spelled.

Has anyone seen a Unicode font with such ligatures? I'd also be interested in learning about Hebrew fonts supporting other unusual ligatures (in the private use area, I imagine).

Thank you.

Indices : Technical Info : Haansoft Unicode Blocks and UniPad Features

This article is designed to list which Unicode blocks are supported by corresponding font and all of the features supported by Sharmahd Computing's UniPad.

Supported Platforms
Microsoft Windows 9x, Windows Me
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Windows 200X, Windows XP
WINE HQ, for x86-based Unixes, including Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris
Windows CE ≥
Microsoft Windows 3.x
Linux / X-Windows
Mac OS X
Palm OS ≥

General Features
Full BiDi support (Hebrew, Arabic, Thaana, Syriac)
Rendering of Arabic contextual forms
Separated rendering of non-spacing marks
Combined rendering of non-spacing marks (!)
Normalization (maximal decomposition)
Conversion to precomposed characters
Case conversion
Surrogate support
Printing
Multi-level undo
Attributed text
Coloring/highlighting of formatting characters
Automatic file format detection
Conversion of different line separators
Clipboard support for Unicode
Clipboard support for other character sets
Send file as email attachment

Handling of Formatting Characters
Line Separator
Paragraph Separator
Joiner / Non-Joiner ÷
Symmetric Swapping Activate/Inhibit ≤
Arabic Form Shaping Activate/Inhibit ≤
National Digit Shaping Activate/Inhibit ≤
BiDi (Embedding, Override, Marks)
Tabulator

Fonts / Glyph Sets
Proportional Unified Bitmap Screen Font
Fixed Width Unified Bitmap Screen Font
TrueType support (!)
Multiple font sizes (!)
User definable fonts (!)
User definable Private Use glyphs (!)

Supported Languages
Note: all these languages are supported theoretically, because the scripts that are used to write these languages are supported by Unicode and UniPad. Please see under Supported Unicode Character for the supported scripts. Some languages are listed more than once, because they are known under multiple names.

Abaza, Abkhasian, Adighe, Adygei, Afrikaans, African, Ainu, Aisor, Albanian, Algonquin, Altai, Amharic, Amo, Arabic, Aramaic, Armenian, Assamese, Assyrian, Asturian, Avar, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani (Azeri), Badaga, Bagheli, Bahasa, Balear, Balkar, Balti, Baluchi, Bashkir, Basque, Batak (toba), Bateri, Belarusian, Belgian, Bengali, Berber, Bhasha, Bhatneri, Bhili, Bhojpuri, Bihari, Bini, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buhid, Bulgarian, Burmese, Buryat, Byelorussian, Catalan, Chakma, Chechen, Cherokee, Chhattisgarhi, Chinese, Chukchi, Chuvash, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Croatian, Cyrillic, Czech,
Danish, Daphla, Dargwa, Dari, Divehi, Dungan, Dutch, Dzongkha,
Edo, English, Esperanto, Esoko, Estonian, Ethiopic, Evenki, Ewe, Faroese, Farsi (Persian), Fijian, Finnish, Flemish, French, Frisian, Gaelic, Gagauz, Galician, Garhwali, Garo, Garshuni, Gascon, Ge'ez, Georgian, German, Gondi, Glagolitic, Gothic, Greek, Greenlandic, Guarani, Gujarati, Hallam, Hanunoo, Harauti, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi, Hmong, Ho, Hopi, Hungarian, Huron, Ibibio, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingua, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), Irish, Iroquoian, Italian, Jaipuri, Japanese, Javanese, Judezmo, Kabardian, Kachchi, Kalmyk, Kanarese, Kanauji, Kankan, Kannada, Kanuri, Karachay, Karakalpak, Karelian, Kashmiri, Kazakh, Khakass, Khanty, Khasi, Khmer, Khoisan, Khondi, Kirghiz, Komi, Konkani, Korean, Koryak, Kului, Kumaoni, Kurdish, Kurku, Kurukh, Kuy, Ladino, Lahnda, Lak, Lambadi, Lao, Lappish, Latin, Latvian, Lavna, Lawa (eastern + western), Lezghian, Limbu, Lisu, Lithuanian, Livonian, Lushootseed, Luxemburgish, Macedonian, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maldivian, Maltese, Manchu, Manipuri, Mansi, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Meitei, Mende, Mizo, Moabite, Moldavian, Mon, Mongolian, Mordvin, Munda, Mundari, Naga, Nanai, Navajo, Naxi, Nenets, Nepali, Netets, Newari, Nogai, Norse, Norwegian, Ogham, Oriya, Oromo, Ossetic, Pali, Palpa, Panjabi, Pan-Nigerian, Parsi-dari, Pashto, Persian, Phoenician, Pinyin, Polish, Portuguese, Provencal, Prussian, Punjabi, Quechua, Rhaeto-Romanic, Rian, Romanian, Romany, Runic, Russian, Sami, Samaritan, Sanskrit, Santali, Scottish, Selkup, Semitic, Serbian, Sesotho, Shan, Sherba, Shona, Shor, Sindhi, Sinhala, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Sorbian, Spanish, Sutu, Swadaya, Swahili, Swedish, Swiss, Sylhetti, Syriac, Tabasaran, Tagalog, Tagbanwa, Tahitian, Tajik, Tamazight, Tamil, Tat, Tatar, Telugu, Thaana, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinian, Tigrinya, Tsalagi, Tsonga, Tswana, Tulu, Turkic, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuva, Turoyo, Twi, Udekhe, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur, Ukrainian, Urdu, Uzbek, Valencian, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Walloon, Welsh, Xhosa, Yakut, Yi, Yiddish, Yoruba, Zhuang, Zulu

Formats / Encoding Schemes
UTF-16 / UCS-2
UTF-8
UTF-7
UTF-32 / UCS-4
ASCII + Universal Character Names
ASCII + XML Character References
Standard Compression Scheme

Searching & Replacing
Searching & replacing
Case-insensitive matching
Regular expression matching
Bracket matching Ø
Go to line number

User Interface Languages
English
German

Character Input
Different keyboard layouts
System keyboard layout
Unicode character map
Dead-key input method for accents
East Asian input methods (IME)
Hexadecimal input method
User-definable keyboard layouts
Character input from Unicode locales (e.g. Hindi) on Windows XP Yes
IME character input on non-Asian versions of Windows (e.g. Windows 2000 with East Asian language support)
Direct Unicode character input from external programs (e.g. keyboard tools that send WM_UNICHAR messages)

Keyboard Layouts
Albanian
Arabic
Armenian
Azeri
Bulgarian (Cyrillic)
Bulgarian (Latin)
Byelorussian
Cherokee
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dari
Divehi
Dutch
Dzongkha
English (British)
English (US, International)
English (US)
English (US, Devorak)
Esperanto
Estonian
Finnish
French (Belgian)
French (Standard)
Gaelic
Georgian
German (Swiss)
German (Standard)
Greek
Hawaiian
Hebrew
Hindi (Devanagari)
Hungarian
Icelandic
Inuktitut
ISO 9995 Complementary
ISO 9995 Secondary
ISO 9995 Unified
Italian
Japanese (no IME)
Kannada
Kazakh
Kyrgyz
Latin American
Latvian
Lithuanian
Macedonian
Mongolian (Cyrillic)
Norwegian
Ogham
Pashto
Persian (ISIRI 2901)
Polish
Polish (Programmer)
Portuguese
Punjabi (Gurmukhi)
Romanian
Russian
Serbian (Latin)
Slovak
Spanish
Swedish
Syriac
Tatar
Thai
Turkish
Turkish (F-Type)
Turkish (Q-Type)
Uighur
Ukrainian
Urdu
Uzbek
Uzbek (Southern)
Vietnamese

Haansoft Batang/Haansoft Dotum:
Basic Latin
Latin-1 Supplement
Latin Extended-A
Latin Extended-B
IPA Extensions
Spacing Modifier Letters
Combining Diacritical Marks%
Greek and Coptic
Cyrillic
Cyrillic Supplement
Armenian
Hebrew^
Arabic
Syriac!!
Arabic Supplement^^
Thaana
NKo^^
Samaritan^^
Devanagari‼
Bengali‼
Gurmukhi‼
Gujarati‼
Oriya‼
Tamil‼
Telugu‼
Kannada‼
Malayalam‼
Sinhala‼
Thai‼
Lao‼
Tibetan‼ (removed in 1.1, available in 5.1)
Myanmar‼
Georgian
Hangul Jamo∂
Ethiopic
Ethiopic Supplement
Cherokee
Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
Ogham
Runic
Tagalog∞
Hanunoo∞
Buhid∞
Tagbanwa∞
Khmerℓ
Mongolian∑
Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics Extended^^
Limbu^^
Tai Le^^
New Tai Lue^^
Khmer Symbols^^
Buginese^^
Balinese^^
Sundanese^^
Lepcha^^
Ol Chiki^^
Vedic Extensions^^
Phonetic Extensions^^
Phonetic Extensions Supplement^^
Combining Diacritical Marks Supplement%^^
Latin Extended Additional
Greek Extended
General Punctuation
Superscripts and Subscripts
Currency Symbols
Combining Diacritical Marks for Symbols%
Letterlike Symbols#
Number Forms#
Arrows#
Mathematical Operators#
Miscellaneous Technical#
Control Pictures#
Optical Character Recognition#
Enclosed Alphanumerics#
Box Drawing
Block Elements
Geometric Shapes#
Miscellaneous Symbols#
Dingbats#
Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-A#
Supplemental Arrows-A#
Braille Patterns
Supplemental Arrows-B#
Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-B#
Supplemental Mathematical Operators#
Miscellaneous Symbols and Arrows#
Glagolitic^^
Latin Extended-C^^
Coptic^^
Georgian Supplement^^
Tifinagh^^
Ethiopic Extended^^
Cyrillic Extended-A^^
Supplemental Punctuation^^
CJK Radicals Supplement
Kangxi Radicals
Ideographic Description Characters
CJK Symbols and Punctuation
Hiragana
Katakana
Bopomofo
Hangul Compatibility Jamo
Kanbun
Bopomofo Extended
CJK Strokes^^
Katakana Phonetic Extensions
Enclosed CJK Letters and Months
CJK Compatibility
CJK Unified Ideographs Extension A
Yijing Hexagram Symbols^^
CJK Unified Ideographs
Yi Syllables
Yi Radicals
Lisu^^
Vai^^
Cyrillic Extended-B^^
Bamum^^
Modifier Tone Letters^^
Latin Extended-D^^
Syloti Nagri^^
Common Indic Number Forms^^
Phags-pa^^
Saurashtra^^
Devanagari Extended^^
Kayah Li^^
Rejang^^
Hangul Jamo Extended-A^^
Javanese^^
Cham^^
Myanmar Extended-A^^
Tai Viet^^
Meetei Mayek^^
Hangul Syllables
Hangul Jamo Extended-B^^
High Surrogates
High Private Use Surrogates
Low Surrogates
Private Use Area
CJK Compatibility Ideographs
Alphabetic Presentation Forms
Arabic Presentation Forms-A
Variation Selectors
Vertical Forms
Combining Half Marks
CJK Compatibility Forms
Small Form Variants
Arabic Presentation Forms-B
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
Specials

Haansoft Batang Supplementary:
Linear B Syllabary^^
Linear B Ideograms^^
Aegean Numbers^^
Ancient Greek Numbers^^
Phaistos Disc^^
Lycian^^
Carian^^
Old Italic
Gothic
Ugaritic^^
Old Persian^^
Deseret
Shavian^^
Osmanya^^
Cypriot Syllabary^^
Imperial Aramaic^^
Phoenician^^
Lydian^^
Kharoshthi^^
Old South Arabian^^
Avestan^^
Inscriptional Parthian^^
Inscriptional Pahlavi^^
Old Turkic^^
Rumi Numeral Symbols^^
Kaithi^^
Cuneiform^^
Cuneiform Numbers and Punctuation^^
Egyptian Hieroglyphs^^
Byzantine Musical Symbols^^
Musical Symbols^^
Ancient Greek Musical Notation^^
Tai Xuan Jing Symbols^^
Counting Rod Numerals^^
Mathematical Alphanumeric Symbols
Mahjong Tiles^^
Domino Tiles^^
Enclosed Alphanumeric Supplement^^
Enclosed Ideographic Supplement^^
CJK Unified Ideographs Extension B^^
CJK Unified Ideographs Extension C^^
CJK Compatibility Ideographs Supplement^^
Tags$
Variation Selectors Supplement^^

(!) This feature has high priority

(1) Supports all opening and closing punctuation
(2) Only for Arabic
(3) These characters are deprecated
(4) Due to platform restrictions, not all UniPad features are supported
(5) Font needs the ccmp OpenType feature and accents to combine diacritics automatically
(6) Automatic visual combination of Hebrew accents is not supported
(7) Font does not support Syriac shaping, the nominal glyphs are displayed instead. Needs OpenType features to support Syriac shaping
(8) Contextual forms of those letters are not supported, nominal glyphs are displayed instead. Needs OpenType features to support contextual forms of those letters.
(9) Automatic arrangement of jamo components as Hangul syllables is not supported. Needs OpenType features to support arrangement of jamo components as Hangul syllables
(10) Automatic visual combination of vowel marks/accents is not supported
(11) Vertical direction is not supported, characters are displayed from left to right instead
(12) Shaping behavior (i. e. selection of glyph variants) is not supported
(13) All glyphs are monospaced instead of proportional
(14) The glyphs in the font are not supported, the blank glyphs are displayed instead
(15) Some glyphs are inspired from Everson Mono

Hello everyone,

I am in need of your suggestions.

A little background is needed: the University where I work and study is using the Angel LMS. The biblical language professors are trying to find a font that could be standardized for both Hebrew and Greek.*

What are our options, considering the following requirements:

  • Unicode
  • Must have support for Greek & Hebrew (must point correctly in Hebrew)
  • License: something that would allow us to upload to our own server and distribute to registered students only** / or system font (cross-platform compliant)

*They're open to using separate fonts for Hebrew / Greek if needed.
[EDIT] ** Through a secure LMS.

I'd appreciate your help.

Dan

Haansoft Standard
Symbols 1
Symbols 2
Latin/Numbers
Korean Jamo
Greek
Box Shapes
Unit Symbols
Enclosed Letters
Parenthesized Numbers
Hiragana
Katakana
Russian
Special Languages
Fractions/Superscripts
Phonetic Alphabet
Extra European
Pinyin, Kanji
Arrows
Parentheses
Mathematical Signs
Parenthesized Kanji
Punctuation
Currencies
Letterlike Signs
Superscripts, Others
Numbers
Extra Signs and Dingbats
Science Symbols
Kanji 1
Kanji 2

Korean Wansung Characters
Extra Symbols
Fullwidth ASCII Characters
Korean
Double Korean
Roman Numerals
Greek
Box Drawing
Unit Symbols
Extra Roman Signs and Others
Kana Letters
Cyrillic Letters
Hangul Syllables
Kanji

Unicode 3.2 Characters
Basic Latin
Latin-1 Supplement
Latin Extended-A
Latin Extended-B
IPA Extensions
Spacing Modifier Letters
Combining Diacritical Marks
Greek and Coptic
Cyrillic
Cyrillic Supplementary
Armenian
Hebrew
Arabic
Syriac
Thaana
Devanagari
Bengali
Gurmukhi
Gujarati
Oriya
Tamil
Telugu
Kannada
Malayalam
Sinhala
Thai
Lao
Tibetan
Myanmar
Georgian
Hangul Jamo
Ethiopic
Cherokee
Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics
Ogham
Runic
Tagalog
Hanunoo
Buhid
Tagbanwa
Khmer
Mongolian
Latin Extended Additional
Greek Extended
General Punctuation
Superscripts and Subscripts
Currency Symbols
Combining Diacritical Marks for Symbols
Letterlike Symbols
Number Forms
Arrows
Mathematical Operators
Miscellaneous Technical
Control Pictures
Optical Character Recognition
Enclosed Alphanumerics
Box Drawing
Block Elements
Geometric Shapes
Miscellaneous Symbols
Dingbats
Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-A
Supplemental Arrows-A
Braille Patterns
Supplemental Arrows-B
Miscellaneous Mathematical Symbols-B
Supplemental Mathematical Operators
CJK Radicals Supplement
Kangxi Radicals
Ideographic Description Characters
CJK Symbols and Punctuation
Hiragana
Katakana
Bopomofo
Hangul Compatibility Jamo
Kanbun
Bopomofo Extended
Katakana Phonetic Extensions
Enclosed CJK Letters and Months
CJK Compatibility
CJK Unified Ideographs Extension A
CJK Unified Ideographs
Yi Syllables
Yi Radicals
Hangul Syllables
High Surrogates
High Private Use Surrogates
Low Surrogates
Private Use Area
CJK Compatibility Ideographs
Alphabetic Presentation Forms
Arabic Presentation Forms-A
Variation Selectors
Combining Half Marks
CJK Compatibility Forms
Small Form Variants
Arabic Presentation Forms-B
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
Specials
Old Italic
Gothic
Deseret
Byzantine Musical Symbols
Musical Symbols
Mathematical Alphanumeric Symbols
CJK Unified Ideographs Extension B
CJK Compatibility Ideographs Supplement
Tags
Supplementary Private Use Area-A
Supplementary Private Use Area-B

I am about to assign a bunch (approx. 500) of Private Use UNICODE to the following which do not have official UNICODES and are not yet [to my knowledge] covered by Adobe Glyph List:

Nut fractions
Annotation Superiors
Superior Punctuation
Small Cap Numbers
Small Caps Punctuation
Tabulated Numbers
Titling Capitals (x140ish)
Titling Lowercase (x140ish)
Titling Numbers
Reversed Encapsulated Sansserif Capitals
and perhaps a few other ornaments (not dingbats) etc.

Q. Are there any established Code-blocks for the listed glyphs above *agreed* between foundries?

I am posting here before approaching anyone individually. My next step is to check the future of the Adobe Glyph List but first I want to gauge the reaction to having so many apparently missing UNICODES.

If it seems reasonable, perhaps I may make a formal proposal to UNICODE Consortium. It feels better for me to push for some kind of universal acceptance of principle and/or get a better understanding of peoples feeling towards this before I go ahead and assign my one Private Use UNICODES to my own fonts regardless.

I am conscious that if the above Glyphs can have UNICODES shared amongst the Community this will make fonts sharing the UNICODE compatible and easily interchangeable.

/michael

I'm looking for an italic font with wide Latin and Cyrillic support that looks similar to this Greek font, GFS Solomos. Here's a sample, Romans 3:21-26 (the first word is in GFS Decker for small caps):

The closest thing I have right now is the italic version of Garamond, but it's not quite right--the strokes are too thin and the letters are too narrow. The sample below compares similar glyphs, GFS Solomos on left, italic Garamond on right:

Thanks so much in advance!
--PADetz