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Hi friends

please help me Id the font used for www.CabitetStudio.ca

Thanks in advance

Hernando

Hi,
Anyone know which fonts Bon use in their magazine and online?
Especially interested in the serif one with the words "Ädelsten & Asfalt".

Hello,
wondering what this font is called?
Thanks in advance!

Looking for something to represent the typeface used to annotate images in Gray's Anatomy drawings. Thought it might be Garamond but the 'g' is wrong. It ws published in 1858. Not a big choice of typefaces then. Maybe someone knows and will tell me while I search!

I am working on an Editorial project about analog creative practices, and would like to design the spreads as independent from the computer as I can get. As a student educated solely on the computer I am excited to explore these practices.

So I need to create a body of text in 9pt Adobe Caslon regular. I have looked into Chartpak and Letraset and have yet to find my exact needs.

Can anyone suggest a resource or a practice to achieve my desired result? I am also considering phototypesetting, but don't know much about it.

Any information would be helpful!

Thank you!

I know I have come across each of these faces many times but I can't put my finger on what they are or where I saw them. Any help? It would be much appreciated.

Cheers.

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Hi there,

I think this is a cut of baskerville with customised 'k' and cap 'd' but im just guessing so I was wondering if anyone knew it?

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First time posting so excuse me if I leave anything out. I need to design around an awful logo I was given and am having a hard time matching the font 100%. I get close, but the "y" is always the downfall. Any help is appreciated. Thanks in advance!

Anyone know what this beautiful slab is?

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Hi Typophile,

First time posting on the forum so hopefully some of you guys can help me with this one? I am struggling to identify a typeface which has been used throughout the branding of a company I am currently redesigning.

The typeface is used predominantly in the logo, hopefully when its identified I will be able to see if its commercially available as a web font to use online:

Any help would be greatly appreciated,

Thanks,
Lewis.

Need help finding a something similar to "Norfolk and Western" in this image:

http://lionelllc.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/6-29365_j611.jpg

actually, if you guys know of anything similar to the numerals as well it would be awesome

This is my first post on here,
figured it would be the place to go.

Thanks!

Can anyone ID this please, thanks in advance.

The attached image is the work of designer David Rudnick, however I recently stumbled across a font in development on either this site or a different typography forum using this style as well, but I can't find it anywhere. If you know what I'm talking about a link would be cool, but since I have no other details, that's not the point of this post.

What style of lettering is this? The super-elongated, overly ornamented letterforms that intertwine with each other are so beautiful. I would love to learn more about it but have no information - anything would be appreciated.

Thanks!

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Hello

I am looking to find out more about the serif font used in BLAST 1, the famous British Vorticist publication. THe sample attached is of the serif face in question, the rest of the publication primarily uses a heavy Grot.

If you don't know it already, well worth a look at some truly avant-garde typography considering the context. http://dl.lib.brown.edu/mjp/render.php?view=mjp_object&id=1143209523824844

thanks as always for any time and assistance.

M

Hi everyone!

This is my first attempt to get competent critique about my font. So please, Don’t beat me up too hard :)
I will be very appreciated about any critics and comments.
My first serif typeface I am trying to make a little bit retro, fashy, but contemporary.
It has 5 different serif shapes depending on the position of prominent parts of letters (maybe a little bit too complicated, but I like it).
I know there are still many things to work on and improve, but the main parts I am really not sure about are sharp ends of stems. The stems are the only parts without any serifs and I guess it makes the whole face unusual.
Please look at PDF files attached below.
I made the stems a little bit out of the baseline to prevent them to look shorter than next letters, but I think it still looks wired at large points. At sample "i" looks longer than next "l" and so on.. . May be I made them too sharp or too long? Is there any way to do not change the shape? Or may be I need to make the bottom parts of letters more consequent? Or it is Okay?
I need your opinions.

Thank you for your time and responce!

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LTC Italian Old Style was originally released by P22/Lanston Type Company in 2006. The font, based on Frederic Goudy's interpretation of Nicholas Jenson's Roman face as well as other Renaissance Roman faces, has been newly updated by James Grieshaber for the Lanston Type Company. LTC Italian Old Style Pro is now offered as a pro font family containing 4 styles- Regular, Italic, Light and Light Italic. OpenType features include the original ligatures, small caps and expanded language coverage. The Roman styles, Regular and Light, also welcome the addition of ornaments.

LTC Italian Old Style Pro

Italian Old Style, designed by Frederic Goudy in 1924, was digitized by Paul Hunt in 2007. In 2013, it has been updated by James Grieshaber and is now offered as a pro font. The newly expanded pro font includes all of the original ligatures, plus small caps and expanded language coverage in all 4 pro styles- Regular, Italic, Light and Light Italic.

LTC Italian Old Style is not to be confused with the English Monotype font also called "Italian Old Style", which is an earlier design from 1911 based on William Morris's Golden Type that is based on Nicholas Jenson's Roman face. Goudy went back to Jenson's original Roman and other Renaissance Roman faces for his inspiration and the result is what many consider to be the best Renaissance face adapted for modern use.

Bruce Rogers was one of the biggest admirers of Italian Old Style and designed the original specimen book for Italian Old Style in 1924 using his trademark ornament arrangement. These ornaments are now contained in the pro versions of the Roman styles- Regular Pro and Light Pro.

The light weights of LTC Italian Old Style were digitized from larger display sizes (14, 18, 24, 30, 36 pt) and the regular weights were digitized from smaller composition sizes (8,10,12 pt.). The fitting for the regular weights is noticeably looser to allow for better setting at small sizes. Very few font revivals take this approach.

The LTC Italian Old Style Pro Family is being offered at a very special introductory price through August 31st. More details here:

LTC Italian Old Style Pro

What is this? I looks like something newish and that ampersand looks somewhat bree-esque. something from typetogether?

I'm working on a little project for this association and they have no idea what font was used for their identity. I have searched and searched and found that it is similar to Berling but it isn't quite a match. I will be eternally grateful if you fine folks knew what the main font was or even the font in the tagline "always in season." It would give me something to work with.

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This is a partial draft of a contemporary serif project I'm working on. It was initially thought as a typeface for personal use, but it could be turned into a real release if the work would reach a decent level. The family is planned to have four weights in roman and italic versions.

Some ideas:

1. it must be suitable for books and magazines, but trying to use more contrast than one finds in most recent good typefaces (as Meta Serif, Greta Text, Tisa or Premiera). It's not a serif to very small sizes and low quality prints.

2. it must be clean, with a strong horizontal impression (like Utopia, Cartier, Expo Serif and the ones used in The Guardian and Hebdo newspapers redesign) and also reduced ornamental elements.

3. it must be highly readable when used in legal and technical texts with intensive use of numerals and acronyms (never found a typeface which suits perfectly this need). This must be reach with small caps somewhat higher than lowercases and old style numerals more aligned to baseline.

4. target sizes are 9 to 18pt.

Actually, there is just part of the basic lc set. I hope to add the more difficult lc characters (g, k, w, z) within a week. By now, I'm not satisfied with /f/ and the /fi/ ligature. /v/ also seems no good.

It's the first time I try to design a typeface and it's more difficult than I thought (these lc took almost a week to be drawn). I'm working directly in Illustrator to do a later import into FL.

Any comment will be very welcome.

Hi folks,

Appreciate anyone who chips in to this. Fleshing out a branding/identity project and looking for pairing a serif typeface with Akkurat:

http://lineto.com/The+Fonts/Font+Categories/Text+Fonts/Akkurat/

Akkurat is already established, used in the logo and has been used for body text. It is for a design agency. The challenge I've had is choosing a serif face to partner it. Why? When creating documents with longer passages of text, I'd rather not use Akkurat for absolutely everything. A lot of the clients are Universities and in the Education sector, and I always feel they prefer serifs as well (albeit ungrounded research).

I've been looking for character shapes that match Akkurat (and the usual elements like x-height, descender/ascender height). I feel the old classics just aren't doing it: Baskerville, garamond, bembo, sabon, century, even bodoni – they just seem too big a jump. I feel it will be something more 'modern'. Even slab serif.

So far, I've liked FM by A2 type. I like how it shares the square dots i.e. full stop, 'i', 'j'. I am a fan of Publico and Mercury as well, but don't feel they are right for this.

So that's the pairing challenge – appreciate any help.

Thanks,

Lewis

Hello,

I'm a type fan-if-still-newbie and first-time poster compelled to submit a request for a coworker. She's been asked to recreate a very simple type design--for a quick-turnaround offset print job that needs a speedy diagnosis. She tried many variations of classic serif faces, but couldn't get the "C" or the "T" quite right. I didn't have any further suggestions off the top of my head. Also, is this semibold in weight?

Thanks in advance for any help!

(.pdf file attached)

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Hi Typophilian Mates

I just done a new fontface design.. called "Serifada" based on concept of Chilean Hitory.. following some aesthetics and synesthetic asociations. Although this can be clasified like display that hard serif and broken shapes help to make a better readable text. I don't an expert but I done some test and run so well on small sizes.

I hope get your opinions and critiques

regards..!!
=)
Pedro [PeGGO]

NOTE: The old name "Politica" belong to Ale Paul font, an now my design name has been changed by "Politic"

This logo was designed for us by an advertising agency designer who has since left the agency. The CD has no record of the work, and I have had no luck trying to identify the font. One special feature of the font is the letter "k". Does anyone know the name of this font?

Thanks,

Tom Kerr

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Hi everyone!

This is my first attempt to get competent critique about my font. So please, Don’t beat me up too hard :)
I will be very appreciated about any critics and comments.
My first serif typeface I am trying to make a little bit retro, fashy, but contemporary.
It has 5 different serif shapes depending on the position of prominent parts of letters (maybe a little bit too complicated, but I like it).
I know there are still many things to work on and improve, but the main parts I am really not sure about are sharp ends of stems. The stems are the only parts without any serifs and I guess it makes the whole face unusual.
Please look at PDF files attached below.
I made the stems a little bit out of the baseline to prevent them to look shorter than next letters, but I think it still looks wired at large points. At sample "i" looks longer than next "l" and so on.. . May be I made them too sharp or too long? Is there any way to do not change the shape? Or may be I need to make the bottom parts of letters more consequent? Or it is Okay?
I need your opinions.

Thank you for your time and responce!

| Attachment | Size | | --- | --- | | Unique.pdf | 767.08 KB |

Hi can someone please tell me what font is being used in the attached image.
I tried using the automated font recognition tool at but the closest match it could find (which was not an exact match) was ITC Weidemann Medium.
The document that I have uploaded is a snippet of a scanned image of a document that was printed in 1992, so the font must have been around before then.