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Hi,

I've just got a bit confused on how to spot Humanist, Transitional and Modernist typefaces?

Can anyone help me out on what to look for please?

I thought I knew how to tell, but when it came to it, I just completely forgot.
I keep thinking it's something to do with the angle of letters and how geometric they look??

(if you get your info from a website can you link me please as I need references, thanks)

thanks in advance anyway

I just wanted to show you a new typeface I started as a little break on a different typeface I'm doing for a client.

It started with an idea on a certain flow of lines within the /a but quickly thereafter I removed the terminal and created this sort of naked serif typeface.

I like the a, b, d and r in particular (which is not to say no more adjustments will be made though) but I'm rather uncertain about the /c and and /e as they're perhaps too classical. I suppose with this typeface I essentially want to bring a few classical/chirographic aspects and think it through to a logical, modern conclusion. I feel the /o could be wider but I will have a closer look at that when doing more elaborate text samples.

Any criticism is welcome.

| Attachment | Size | | --- | --- | | Baran v1.pdf | 282.22 KB | | Baran v2.pdf | 280.64 KB | | Baran v3.pdf | 313.77 KB | | Baran v6.pdf | 313.12 KB | | Baran v6 text sample.pdf | 399.71 KB |

The style known as Scotch Roman is considered as a modern face.
But if you look closely at the design of a Scotch Roman, it appears it has the bracketed serifs of the transitional faces.
Modern faces in the Vox-AtypI definition are called Didones meaning Didot and Bodoni. These two types have hairline serifs.
Punchcutter Richard Austin who previously worked for John Bell and gave him transitional types was the creator of Scotch Roman.
I observed some specimen of Scotch Roman that have the high contrast of the Didones.

What is your view on Scotch Roman inside the Vox-AtypI category system?

I saved pictures from typefaces from the foundry Swiss Typefaces and I always sort out the pictures I save according to category so I can find everything back on my computer. Now, I have a bit of trouble with categorizing two of their typefaces: Romain and Sang Blue, which are both related. I have the feeling it's just the contrast that makes me think they're didone-like, while the model is actually transitional.

The design of both typefaces is obviously inspired by Romain du Roi, which I always thought of as a transitional typeface (though exploring the boundaries thereof as it clearly takes things further than Baskerville). Gert Wiescher designed a digital version called Royal Romain, which on MyFonts is tagged as Bodoni (which I don't quite see, but I suppose it could just refer to Giambattista Bodoni's work in general) and Didone. On Wiescher's website his Royal Romain is labeled under "Antiqua fonts".

So how would you label these typefaces? I think the flat top serifs give the designs a didone atmosphere, but they're less mechanical and lack the teardrop terminals usually associated with the didone style. Am I right to consider these typefaces to be transitional?

Also, where exactly do you draw the line, or is there simply no line? I recently stumbled upon Valentina, which I would consider a didone but it's clearly blurring those lines quite a bit.

Hi all, just hoping you could help me out here.

I'm making a type specimen book for my sophomore portfolio review and I'm trying to find distinguishing characters for twenty typefaces. I've been having some trouble finding information on some of the typefaces, so I turn it to you. I need at least 5 distinguishing characters for each, preferably in Roman or Regular, and why they distinguish the typeface. I'm thinking that I'm going to use Q in all of my designs, because almost every Q is different and special. I just need help with the why it is special and wording it appropriately.

Typefaces I still need information for:
ITC Cheltenham
Berkeley Oldstyle
Interstate
Minion

and a few others I haven't researched just yet, so not sure if there is or isn't information. Will update accordingly.

Hi all, just hoping you could help me out here.

I'm making a type specimen book for my sophomore portfolio review and I'm trying to find distinguishing characters for twenty typefaces. I've been having some trouble finding information on some of the typefaces, so I turn it to you. I need at least 5 distinguishing characters for each, preferably in Roman or Regular, and why they distinguish the typeface. I'm thinking that I'm going to use Q in all of my designs, because almost every Q is different and special. I just need help with the why it is special and wording it appropriately.

Typefaces I still need information for:
ITC Cheltenham
Berkeley Oldstyle
Interstate
Minion

and a few others I haven't researched just yet, so not sure if there is or isn't information. Will update accordingly.

Finally I have decided to publish the fruit of my labour on MyFonts. The result for now is yet another version of Baskerville Old Face but with the added suffixes ”KTKM” and ”Display” (Baskerville Old Face KTKM-Display).

I wanted to improve the contrast between thick and thin, reduce some ink-traps and give stems, serifs and links a smoother overall feel. I have also added some alternative letters, ligatures and old style numerals.

Feedback is highly appreciated.

Best regards,
Kristian Möller

Over the last year or so I've grown quite interested in (roughly) nineteenth-century face styles around the Bell, Oxford/Monticello and Scotch Roman evolutionary tree. For a while now I've been working on designing a typeface based on some of the ideas I've had along these lines.

W.A. Dwiggins famously set out to tame Scotch Roman by blending it with modern features from William Martin's work, resulting in Caledonia. I wanted to try moving in arguably the opposite direction: exploring the possibilities found in Scotch's immediate precedents among the transitional types.

This is what I've come up with. I took some basic ideas from Scotch and Bell and tried to create something with a crisp and rational structure but a touch of nineteenth-century ornamentation.

I haven't settled on a final name for it yet. For the time being I've dubbed it 'Alexandrina' because it strikes me as vaguely Victorian. (A nod to any who get the reference.)

I'm basically aiming for something that's good for captions and relatively short snippets of text, but could be used more generally without causing serious problems. I think it probably works best at around 12-15 point.

I have alternate versions of /f, /g, and /t which I'm thinking should be made default at 12 point size and below. (The last paragraph in the PDF shows the use of these alternates in a 12-point paragraph.)

I'm still not sure about a few points...

  • I'm not sure if the ampersand works. It looked nice when I sketched it on paper, but after creating the outline I'm not so convinced.
  • I'm not happy about the @ sign... not only is it pretty generic but I don't think it's all that well drawn. (This is by far the hardest character for me to draw, as a rule.)
  • The numbers need a bit more work still.
  • I think some of the symbols are probably a bit too light.

Any thoughts?

Thanks...

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Hi everyone,

I'm working on a project which needs italics with a little more oomph to them, and I'm looking for something in the transitional or modern forms. My point of departure in this search is the new Didot Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes completed for Vanity Fair. According to their own blog on the commission, the drawings they built their didone from revive a specific letterer's cuts: Molé Le Jeune.

I'm not necessarily convinced that Didot, specifically, is what I'm looking for (and the Vanity Fair revival is also really peculiar and modernized, in ways I'm not so interested in). But the excessive sloping—the "speed" of these italics—is very much what I need. And I like this "voice" of rational, modern forms (and of the 'more' rational forms from the transitionals like Baskervilles and Bookmans—the Zapf International would probably fit this bill, but I'm not wild on its digitization, and the itals are still not anywhere as far forward as the VF Didot).

Are there any suggestions out there about commercial releases you know of that fit this basic Modern/Transitional categorization, which seem perhaps more "eager" in their forward lean, than a typical italic in the genres? I looked at a few things, from Hoefler&Co's Surveyor to James Montalbano's Consul (both of which I love, but I'm not sure are quite leaning forward as much as I wish they would), but I'm not convinced yet that I've found anything really compelling. I am sure, however, that my knowledge of foundries is limiting me greatly and hoping a crowdsourcing here might prove useful to me and others looking for such.

Help much appreciated & many thanks in advance.

Hello typophile community, I would love any advice and criticism that you might offer regarding my first font. I intend on using it to break into the type design industry and have been tweaking it constantly. I think the time has come for other, more experienced, eyes to have a go.

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